Emo Dojo
Emo Dojo

Episode · 1 year ago

Denying climate/ Change can have deadly results/ If not influence

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Updates include John's perspective on the extreme winter storm blasting the American midwest, and what he's recently learned about the differences between hobbyists, artists, content creators, celebrity, and influecers.

Welcome back to the mighty EMO Dojo. My Name's John and these are my updates. So today's updates include my perspective on the giant Winter Storm Gripping America, what I learned about influencers versus celebrities, a sneak peak about this weekend's guest and, of course, an update on the EMO Dojo project. So sit back, relax and enjoy. You know, as a Californian, I never really paid much attention to the weather maps. When I'd watch the Morning News, you know national newscast, I would just look at it like, Oh hell, it's pretty wild over there. It's always blue and white and purple and we always have the orange and yellow and red. Every once in a while people would get some green and apparently that's like perfect weather. Green. You Want Green. But then, of course California started getting wildfires. And Yeah, ultimately one of the reasons I moved away from California. Well, not permanently, it's like my home, but was because of all the concrete. For one, it just everything was built up and then the smoke. Then the smoke came forest fires. At some point we were surrounded and the way the bay works around San Francisco, is it? Just if it's pulling the are the wrong way, it's going to draw all of the smoke from the surrounding mountains right down into the on top of the bay water effectively, and if you live anywhere near there. So yeah, I had masks from back then, well before the pandemic came around. But you know, then I got to Louisiana, and this is the weird thing too. So when I get to the new place, the weather castors are saying things like, Oh, this is record breaking. So anyway, the people there are also surprised. And Louisiana, yeah, just got chased out of there by a couple of hurricanes. Like literally lived through two hurricanes down there. That was weird. Oklahoma got up here and there are. The first thing was ice storm. I talked about this kind of during the ice storm or back when it happened, but people that aren't from here or from experience to true I storm wouldn't know what it is. So here's the thing. I've been to and lived in like Tahoe right, not in the lake around the lake, Tahoe city specifically, and also Alpine meadows and on her lake. So I have lots of experience with snow and super cold weather, but I had no experience with an ice storm. I don't know what that's sure why. Maybe I have, but I just didn't realize it, because the way the infrastructure and like Taho was built, it's built for that, I guess, like the power lines are underground and such. So when, anyway, when this ice storm hit Oklahoma a bit early in the season, all of the trees still had their foliage on them, all the leaves were there, all the bristles and needles and everything were on all of the plants, and that collected tons of water, literally tons and way down all these things and broke them, basically. And it froze for so long outside. We're talking below freezing for many days in a row of Blu week or ten days or something ridiculous, and it froze everything hard. Anything outside that was made of water was frozen. I saw a truck hit a tree and the tree exploded like...

...a chandelier. They just that's it, while the truck didn't really get much damage at all. Was the strangest thing ever. Anyway, that was historic. And now this past week I thought, man, that's an early storm. So another big storm comes down and not only is it cold, it started to bring snow. Well, people around here aren't used to snow, not like this kind of snow. I guess I asked people before, like when I first moved here, does it snow here? And they're like yeah, maybe once or twice a year. So I figured that meant snow like like Tahoe, like feet, many feats of snow. Nah, I didn't mean that. I think it meant like an inch or two. Maybe. The reason I know this is because now that it's snowed six inches, there are nearly enough snow plows to get to the streets, so they only plowed the main streets and everybody in the subdivisions and the neighborhoods, they're literally screwed. They have they don't have shovels for the fronts of their trucks. These people don't even know what chains are. They don't know what tire chains are, snow chains are like in California you often see, oh, there's a chain requirement. If you going up highway eighty or over highway fifty, there's a chain requirement. Well, for this whole entire storm I've watched all of the local newscast nobody wants is mentioned chain requirements, and yet they continually report crashes of people on the freeway sliding out of control because they don't have any fucking chains. I don't get it. Are they spending their money here on guns instead of chains? was there some threat they needed the guns for? Like, where were they when the terrorists were trying to take over the capital? All these gun nuts are they? I don't I don't get it. Are you buying guns instead of chains? Like, why was this area not prepared if it's snowed? That's the mind boggling thing and it drives me crazy because I've really, I feel like I've been cooped up in a little cage for like four days now. So well, I guess I'm not, and I'm going to exercise but my freedom. Tomorrow I'm going to go out, because the truck is four wheel drive and has all terrain tires, so I'm just going to fucking back out of the snowy ass driveway here in the apartment complex and weave my way around all the idiots who have backed out of their parking spots and can't move now and are basically blocking the driveways and huts. It's a mess again because nobody has like a fifty dollar set of chains or cables to put on their tires. I'm also wondering what a lot of the people see. Also in the news in America there's this kind of myth that a lot of people are moving from California to Texas, and that may or may not be true. I know certainly some people are. So I don't know what a lot is, but I know I moved from California to not fucking Texas, to Louisiana and on my way up from Louisiana to Oklahoma, I specifically drove my ass around Texas, not into Texas. It's not my kind of place. See that like Oklahoma. People might think of it as well. I don't know what they think of it. As I thought it was he'll Bie, but now that's more Georgia, Tennessee at West Virginia. Apparently definitely got some swamp people in Louisiana, but obviously those aren't hills, so they're not I'll billy's. But no, Oklahoma just seems like a place people go to hide like anarchist and crazy people. That's what Oklahoma reminds me of Texas, on the other hand. So yeah, obviously there's a reason why things are cheaper in Texas. Look, they have a crappy infrastructure. They get one GODDAMN ICE COO. Okay, now, to be fair, it is extra cold in at the end of this week they're talking about it might get above thirty, which will actually have been a fifty degree swing from two days ago. So two days ago it was twenty and in a couple...

...more days it'll be almost thirty. So that's a pretty big swing and temperature, fifty degree swing and temperature, and yet we still won't be up to freezing. So all of us snow outside. It just sits there. If people drive on it, it squishes it down like sand, compresses it. But there's like, I don't know, eight inches on my back patio that accumulated and snow drifted. I kicked some of it and I was able to sweep a lot of it with the broom. That's how light it was. ANYWAYS, wanted to get rid of that shit before it started to melt and get much heavier and turn into actual work. And the crazy myth that Fox News is peddling about Texas and the power grid down there. So apparently the power grid in Texas is just completely overwhelmed, obviously because it's so goddamn cold. It's minus something right, it's less than zero. Well, at that temperature for so many days again, the pipes freeze, people can't run water and now here's what's going on down in Texas because they have not winter rised their industries. Their industries are set up to provide power in the summertime because it gets fucking hot there and everyone needs their air conditioning. Well, the machinery that runs their power plants is not set up for this kind of cold weather. That goes for the wind turbines, it goes for the gas, the oil, all of it. Solar panels get covered in snow whatnot. But solar and wind only contribute maybe ten percent of power to Texas has energy grid, whereas gas and oil contribute a far greater amount. And when those things failed it's much worse. So I'm not pointing fingers in anyone thing. I think it's smart to divest our energy resources so we don't rely on any one thing. But Holy Moli. So, I mean, don't you get it, people? They have grappy infrastructure. They knew some day it would get cold and their stuff would freeze up. So, basically, the valves, the meters, the things they used to read the flow of energy and things like that, they just freeze up. People can't get to work because cars freeze up. Of Diesel fuel turns to GEL, and some of these tractors and they can't move anymore. It's it's all. That's how cold it got. Or is I should stay. I'm sitting in a warm apartment and, you know whatever, I go outside for entertainment, not for whatever. Anyway, the point being is if, yeah, if you're living somewhere that's cheap, there's a reason that it's cheap, and in this case that's the reason they didn't pay for the proper infrastructure and the in the ironic thing is is a lot of people in Texas are like tend to be conservative, right leaning and to some extent, climate deniers. Climate Change Deniers, not sure the proper term there, and that's exactly what's biting them in the ASS right now. The same thing that they were talking shit about California, for with the grass fires, forest fires, that's all climate change driven. Well, this is what happens in Texas and it freezes all your shit down. How many people in Texas are dead now because they froze to death because they had no water, no energy, no lights. Get in the car and they go out and they get stuck in the snow because they don't have the proper equipment on their car. So now they're stuck in the snow until they're fuel and their car runs out. Now they freeze because nobody can get to them, because the roads are still closed, because the fire trucks can't get through they don't have the right kind of tires and all that stuff for snow either. There was a crash on the turnpike where some big rig caught on fire and they couldn't get anything to it for like half an hour. By the time they got a tank to it, all the tank run out super quick and then froze over. It's just some mess, completely ill prepared. So if you live in the in the Arctic, they got windmills that lasts and...

...can run in super cold weather, way worse temperatures than this. Why? Because they've been winter rized. Same with their pipes for their oil. They just weren't ready. In Texas so all those people who migrated to Texas because it's cheaper, over the next ten years of probably going to find things become a lot more expensive. And it's funny too, because a lot of times, especially I noticed in places like Louisiana, where I used to think, well, why did they move there? Well, obviously people don't necessarily move there, but why do they stay there if there's always hurricanes and things tearing up your land and flood you out? Well, I didn't think about it until I live there, and this is kind of the cool thing about moving around is that you actually get to learn a lot about why things are well, and Louisiana there's a lot of poor people. They have nowhere else to go or they have this weird kind of golden cage situation where they have family property there. So the family property isn't worth that much to sell and go live somewhere else safer and kind of become like a climate migrant. So it's kind of in their mind better just to keep the property because the storms are that bad. They aren't that frequent, but you know over the years they're going to get worse and more frequent. But you know, again, what are they going to do is sitting on property that's quickly going down in value and they're already kind of poor. So where are they going to go? And where would you go? Would you just ride it out? I don't know. I start to think Yek, yeah, that is a reasonable thing to do, although I swear to God if I lived in Louisiana, I would definitely live on posts, live on pylons, or whatever you want to call them. You know, big peers that come out of the ground. O would have them drilled really deep into the ground, so I know they hit bedrock and then they'd come up out of the ground like at least ten fifteen feet, and then I would put my house on top of those posts. That's one way. or I would build a house on floating concrete, much like the houses over an Iceland in places like that that also suffer from global warming because the sea is rising and they are able to live on the coasts in normal houses that are just peered with chains to these giant doc things, but their houses go up and down with the water. I think everybody, and like a place like Oklahoma where they have lots of wind, should live in a dome, like a dome, a geodesec don't home house. Oh my God, there are some that are so cool and I'm pretty sure the costs keep coming down lower and lower until they're competitive now with the regular home construction. But look up like high tech Geodesic Dome home on Youtube and go I got stuck in a wormhole. Man. There's just like Whoa, so many cool things, spiral staircases that kind of circle the outside of the Dome and a Nice Circle and the very top of the Dome that's your master bedroom that looks out over everything. Super Cool Anyway. Yeah, I think it's important to have the proper construction for your zone, but the thing is with climate change, the zones keep moving so quickly, so you almost have to have a fireproof, windproof, floodproof kind of home that moves or is movable. I mean, in my mind I'm envisioning this network of shipping container communities. They might exist already, but not like I'm thinking. I'm talking about ones that have actually a transport network that's included with your rent. So if you live in a fancy and all the transport containers look the same, but like a shipping container you'd see on a train or a ship or whatever, but they all meet the same standards. Very Nice, all the proper amenities that you'd like, but with the rent that you pay, or I guess you could buy it, figure out some way to buy it. Obviously people like to own things. Comes a transport network that you could basically live...

...anywhere you want within the network. So say they've got property on the edge of the Hudson River, wherever, you know, or it just going to be random property wherever. But the thing is you could just have your trailer plop there, live there for a little while, have it picked up, put on the train, put on a boat taking over to Japan, dropped off over there like a stacked trailer village. You could do anything with these things and people can just go move where they want to. But, more importantly, people that need to move could be easily moved to safety when things like ice storms, fires, floods and those sort of things occur. So, you know, I'm like generation X, right. We grew up, we were programmed a certain way. We came to create a bunch of cool things on earth and you know, that's my perspective and a lot of my peers they are really dismissive of influencers, and I was at first because I did not understand what that is like. Well, I don't what is this exactly, because at first glance you get the idea that this why is this person famous for doing nothing, and I'm like, that's just the detail. Active in me said that can't be, that's something else going on here. So I've been doing a bunch of research, both in audiobooks and documentaries on the television, and what I learned, I think, is like the key that will help generation x and baby boomers finally understand what an influencer is and maybe not be so dismissive about them. So, if you don't want to listen any further, and influencer is a salesperson. Yeah, that's what it comes down to. So you have what will generically call content creators. These are people that put stuff up on the Internet for whatever reason. Okay, after a while they develop some credibility with their small audience of whatever it is. Here's where a lot of apparently content creators fail on their way to becoming an influencer, if that's what they're trying to be. They fail in picking a focus because they fail to understand that being an influencers simply being a salesperson. So to become an influencer it's important to pick the things you want to sell. Are you going to sell cosmetics? You're going to sell vagina candles? Are you going to sell, you know, audio programs? Are you got to like? What is the thing you're going to sell? Dog Food Sneakers, watches? Pick it, whatever it is, whatever genre you're in. There's a lot of people like. For example, there's a guy I listen to, Mike del Gattio. He's a Youtuber who is really into microphones, and so when you're a podcaster and you're looking into the best microphones, you often come across Mike's Youtube Channel, where he reviews all the microphones you've been thinking about. Well, he's done that enough that he's become influential and now he gets product and, ostensibly money from microphone companies. They send him free microphones, he talks about them, good or bad. I'm not sure who pays him, but he also is a voiceover actor. So what he is influencing and talking about also adds credibility directly to his day job, let's call it. So, in Mike's case. He had a nice tight focus, created content consistently and persisted and Voila, he's an influencer now, and that's when I started to track it back to like pick any any Weirdo right,...

...not not mike or the not micors microphone show and anything like that, but people that you just see randomly show up on Ellen degenerest during the daytime, like during Covid I've had opportunity to watch daytime TV and people show up on Ellen. I'm like, who the fuck is that? I don't know that person and I'll go look into it. I'm like, Oh, it's an influencer and I'll go look into what they influence. It's always something. They always sell something. So that makes it pretty straightforward. And then, of course there are celebrities who are also influencers. It gets a little bit mixed up here, but let's try to decipher it. So in my mind, or for what I can discern, a celebrity has made it famous doing something other than being a salesperson. Does that make sense? So they're an artist, of some sort of performer whatever, a poets, you name it, a model, those are celebrities. They can use that celebrity for sure to become an influencer. Celebrities are instant influencers the moment they want to sell something. Of course, the flip is not necessarily true, right. A salesperson is not a celebrity. Now there are people that are so good at selling things they eventually elevate to the level of celebrity. You could probably think of very few, because that's how seldom it happens. Most of the people we think of that our celebrity influencers, were celebrity of some sort. Used whatever minor celebrity they had and played their cards right, leverage into business opportunities, became prominent influencers. That way, maintain themselves in the public spotlight became celebrities on top of that. So they became celebrity for being influencers. So that does exist, right. I'm thinking of somebody like Kylie Jenner, who's just born into a spotlight of our none of her choosing right, and she managed to flip that eventually, with the help of others and, you know, her resources at hand, into a Billion Dollar, I think cosmetic industry, some kind of beauty product industry, but people like her are few and far between. Very few people become famous because of their salesmanship, like the shark tank people them, and you know, maybe twenty others are known, but by far most celebrities come from the arts, and that kind of takes it back one more step, right to the beginning. What are people doing that are creating content? Did you start out to create content because you want to be an influencer? If that's the case, you really should stop, figure out what things you want to sell and you can jump start your career that way, because then you're already starting to focus on the right things to talk about. However, if you are a person that just likes to goof around and, like our a hobbyist, like I would consider myself a hobbyist in many ways, especially this show, it's okay to accept that you're a hobbyist. Right. I see, there's hobbyist there's artists. Hobbyists become artist as the improve I see. I see it that way, but not all artists want to go on and become celebrity. Lots of artists have a thing against becoming celebrity. They think that's selling out, for example. So in that sense, hobbyist and artist seem to, quote unquote, create content regardless. They would do that if nobody was around to look at it like. That's a thing like. I think that is the difference between content creators and hobbies artists, is that content creation wasn't the thing before the Internet, whereas hobbies and arts were always the thing. We don't really need content creators. So if you're going to be a content creator to try to be an influencer, please eliminate some of the noise and just pick a focus. If you...

...are a hobbyist and artist, fuck yeah, have fun, go balls out, but just do what you're doing for the passion of it, not because you're trying to, quote unquote, create content and put it on a schedule and Goddamn monetize everything. Oh my God, gives me a Migraine just thinking about that. How many rock bands, how manything like the best rock bands in history, do you think sat down in their first rehearsal? So, g guys, how do you think we're going to monetize this? For Fuck's sake, hobbyist and artists are not content creators by trade. Their Hobbyist and artist. What they do you can turn into intent, but that's not their first thing in life. They would be doing that if nobody was around. So I think it's important that we keep the value on the hobbyists and the artists and remind the content creators that they should really focus if they want to be influencers. Because if you're just creating content for CRIP, why are you putting memes out for no reason? That's so dumb, but I digress. I Apologize. Maybe you're just a meme hobbyist and that's cool too, so I'll just leave it at that. Let's be friends, okay, let's be friends. In fact, let's have Johnny Nash Sing us a little song about being friends. All right, take it away, Johnny. We're in this way doing a struggling alone, just like and there are times when domes. And now back to the wall.

In-Stream Audio Search

NEW

Search across all episodes within this podcast

Episodes (128)