John | Podcasting
John | Podcasting

Episode · 2 years ago

Crossover: A Look Inside A Manic Mind | Author Brett Stevens discusses his new book

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

First-time author, and five-star Amazon-rated storyteller Brett Stevens opens up about his personal journey toward his own “Bipolar Style” and reads from his seriously—riveting new book featuring vignettes of the various outbursts he recalls with rich detail.

So many people with mania can relate to his stories, and will appreciate this discussion about how his new book, 'Crossover: A Look Inside A Manic Mind' came into existence, and his inspiring plans for the future.

[• COLD OPENING] Via Skype: Brett reads the opening “pizza parlor” story over music from Twenty One Pilots + MUTEMATH (“Heathens remix”)

• CLOSING MUSIC: "Party Up (Up In Here)” — The great DMX

• Buy 'Crossover: A Look Inside A Manic Mind': http://bit.ly/bipolar_crossover_book
• Sign up for Brett's email list: https://www.insideamanicmind.com/
• Email: john@bipolarstyle.com
• Public Voice Message: (337) 944-9333

Steak for everybody. Shut the fuck up. I've had enough of you all talking behind my back, I screamed, looking out of a public crowd having lunch that day at a pack pizza shop in Texas. Shut the fuck up, I yelled even louder, as loud as I could. The place one silent, except for twenty one pile of heathens playing on the pop station in the background. Please don't make any sudden moves. You don't know the half of the abuse. I had the crowds attention by foot eight, white skinned, black hair, strong build, light beard. I was wearing shorts, Nike shoes and a soft tshirt that was a gift for my mom this time last year. I looked around and saw nervous college students, fathers ready to protect their wise and young children, and restaurant staff looking for the closest phone to call nine, one one. I took a deep breath, enjoying the peace and quiet that had the existed in my world for the last week. They beam of sunshine shed through the window, lanning directly into my eyes. I've served you well, haven't I? God then a brave man about my height, Chubby and friendly, join me in the spotlight. Hey Man, you all right? Let's take a walk outside. He represented everything I was going to change about the world, this fat, fake world. Then his face transformed, teeth growing into fast as eyes widening, voice deepening, all the spectators disappeared. He put his hand on my shoulder and, in a deep voice, felt it out. Come on, man, there are kids here. I pulled the letters that I need to unscramble and the words hear me let up in the sky. This is your world, Brett. You are my son. Now go take it. Then I was back in the pizza place with the crowd of insignificant mortals. I looked at the man's hand on my shoulder and thrust my arms forward with perfectly utilized force, knocking him back over the table behind him. A chair shifted, and so we're dinged on the floor. A Woman Shriek, kids cried. Now about thirty men stood up ready to physically remove me from the premises, fifteen of them standing in front of the exit. God showed me an image of myself as a high school basketball player, running sprint after sprint to motivate me to escape. I got low and charged forward towards the door with the crowd of wasn't even there. I was met by punches, name calling, kick his ass and the loud rip of my shirt, who are all looking for the same result, getting me out of the restaurant. Eventually, our combined force knocked me out of the front door and onto the street. I stood up like nothing at half and then went about my day with a rip shirt, enjoying the sunlight, available to answer work emails if needed, excited for a blind date that I had planned that evening and, most of all, ready to accept the next challenge that God had in store for me. And out it's online Ad Bible. This stylecoms with Bible style. What you've just been listening to is it excerpt from the new book crossover by Brett Stevens, as read by Brett Stevens. So today I'm honored to have, via skype, Brett Stevens. Welcome, Brett, thanks for being on the show. Thank you very much, glad to be here. Your book is excellent, the parts I've read so far. For the Listener, please look up Brett's book. What's your website again? A manic something inside a manic mindcom that's it. Go to inside a manic mindcom. In fact, pause this podcast and go do that right now. Inside a manic mindcom. Put in your email address and Brett will send you a sample of his book. You can also go on Amazon. I'll put a link down in the notes, and look at all those five star ratings for this book. It's incredible. So, like I said, I'm honored to have you here and I'm really proud of you for...

...completing an actual book and having it published. You're actually an author, man, congrats. Thanks. Thanks, Dra. Feels pretty good. Yeah, right, how man, a lot of people want to write books. A lot of people have bipolar. That those two hardly ever connect and both are difficult living, living with bipolar and writing a book. Book. So how did you come to to put the book together? Yeah, so the book started as more of like a fair therapeutic exercise, which I think is pretty common when you are diagnosed with a serious illness. Writing down your thoughts, journaling, is definitely a very positive activity to do and honestly, I've never really been a writer before this happened and I just found that I was enjoying it and getting a little deeper into my stories and finding ways to connect and, you know, create more of what actually happens in my life. And I think the biggest thing that had me continue with the writing was I told some of these stories verbally to some very close family members that had no idea that this is what it was like, and as I read them what I wrote, you know, it became very evident that it was kind of shocking to them. So I figured if I can continue to write this and kind of make it to the end, it might be able to help other people. Definitely, and storytelling is one thing, but the way you present your stories, I think, is extraordinary. I read tons, a real lot and I have lots of stories of my own, and so it's one thing to say, dude, I was in the pizza parlor and I fucking went off and I just bolted out the door. Done right, but you color your stories with so much rich detail that it's really a treat to that to not only to read but to kind of just envision. You can really feel like you're in that situation into anybody that suffers with the bipolar impairment will have a lot of empathy for your stories and probably see themselves in a lot of these stories. So that's why I thought you would be perfect for a show like this, because, you know, that's what it's all about, is showing the rest of the world that we are definitely fund we can function right, we can function. We just have a bit more highs and more lows than the average person. So reading that pizza parlor story in particular, it just really stood out to me. The softest of the t shirt, the you know, the description of the kid you bump down. How many people were there blocking your exit, even when you wanted to exit yourself. The whole scenario just really resonated with me. And you said you had not written before, I mean aside from like, you know, high school or college writing. Yeah, and it just kind of float out. There weren't too many edits and I'm glad you got that kind of experience because really that's what most of the sections in the book they cover. You know, that's the opening and it's it's intense, but you'll see as the episode is rammed up there's, you know, dirty passages that are very similar in different situation, and I'm just glad that you know, you took something from that. Yeah, definitely, and the baseball one, I like that a lot when you first discovered you had asthma by way of getting, you know, dust kicked down your throat. We're at Bat. That sounds miserable, but again, you know, not having suffered from asthma, I started to really feel like, oh, that must be that must suck, and I really felt like you'd conveyed your thought very accurately. And I think a real cool thing about books like yours. Again, we're talking to Brett Stevens. His new book is Crossover. It's available on Amazon and probably many other places. So when I read a book like yours, I think it's even more critical for friends and family of bipolar sufferers to read books like this, because then they start to understand that, you know, we can function, we can be on...

...podcast, we can write books, we can, you know, do all of these things. But when you read the intensity of some of these stories, I think a lay person would finally start to understand that there's like there's a different thing happening here, but it's not permanent, you know. Like I think bipolar people get classified in the same way as maybe schizophrenic people or something, and people just think we're whacka do all the time. So I think showing your book in kind of contrasting your stories then to your presentation now, for example, I think it's really powerful, not to just bipolar sufferers but to friends and family as well. Yeah, and I think too, it's the the opposite is true. So, you know, we can be perceived as wacky or crazy or dangerous, or on the other end it's Oh, you know you're you're getting frustrated, or you know you're really sad, like your you know your mood has been up and down. Or if someone kind of like has a natural, healthy reaction, emotional reaction of something, it's you must be bipolar or or I'm feeling bipolar today. You know that that's just not how it works, and I honestly would not have known that until I was diagnosed. I took abnormal psych in college and read about bipolar and had, you know, really I knew the definition, but that was about it. So it's definitely, you know, an example of how intense and rammed up my experience was. But then you also see how that similar energy was very helpful in business and in professional poker and in basketball to be successful. So I you know, I can't really complain too much and I'm learning how to manage it and, you know, hoping to have this balance and keep this to bility I have now, you know, for a very long time. Yeah, now that you're diagnosed and you can kind of identify the feelings and emotions that are involved with bipolar, like I always like in depression, to a big dark, black oily tsunami coming at me. You could see it coming to distance, I feel it, it's almost here. Shit, I'm in it. So the different ways to describe that. But in Hind sights, how how early do you think you had bipolar? Do you think you were born with it? Do you think it developed as a child like so, what are the feelings you felt back then that you might now ascribe to bipolar disorder? Sure? Well, I'm very lucky to have had, you know, two great parents, great family, very good resources growing up, and so really I can only speak to my experience, which, you know, I had a very healthy childhood. There was a lot of competitiveness, but between my brothers and I I did get very angry yet times. I was able to put that into basketball as an outlet and it really wasn't until college where I even had any consideration of what depression was or being manic. It wasn't. None of that was happening until my first episode, and that's where I learned that something was off in my brain. I didn't necessarily have depression or I wasn't able to see the depression coming. But what happens, at least with me, is I have these very high highs and then I have a very eighteen month period of depression to kind of remain stable. So I can honestly say I didn't really see any warning signs until college and then, you know, I've had three total episodes and it took the third one to officially become diagnosed. So my episodes kind of came and went without too much reflection or understanding about what was mania know, what was depression, what happened? It was more just like, okay, I kind of overcame that and I'm just going to move off my life now. And it wasn't until I officially got the diagnosis and had just a major episode really, you know, living it at somewhat healthy life, besides just being a little bit isolating stressed from work, that's when I really started to understand more...

...what it's about and really this book is my reflection and you won't see too much depression or, you know, there's not a lot of description about those, you know, qualities of bipolar throughout my childhood, which I write about, but you do really see them, you know, during episodes and during recovery. That's that's a good point. Like not too many people does not too many great stories into the depression side of things. I mean, I laid in bed for three weeks and shut all the blinds. That would be my story and anybody the depression understands that. In fact, it's hard to to me. It would be almost impossible to write about depression while in the throes of depression, except for maybe just complaining or whining on twitter or something that nobody loves me, something like that. Do you or can you share the details of, say, your first episode, let's say, like what was the first thing that happened that made you think I got to get this checked out? Well, unfortunately it didn't quite go that way for me and any of my episodes. One of the hardest things, well, but I go through is I have a zero awareness of it's happening or it's ramping up or anything like that. So I'm in school and I'm hearing messages from birds. I'm really, you know, trying to envision other people's perspectives and I'm looking at all of my college, you know, peers and students and seeing them in different ways. I'm thinking about I'm thinking that the professors are talking about me, and I'm not sleeping. I'm working out, you know, throughout the middle of the night, and my brother visited, thank God. He know that something was was off, which led to me being very confused about why I was leaving school, why I'm walking into a psych ward. I didn't I was excited to go to the psych word because I thought it was some and you know. So I was lucky my brother brought me into that episode after, you know, about a week of just intense, you know, vivid delusions, hallucinations, all described in the book, and that that's for kind of like the first episode. I also go into detail what it's like to be in the hospital three separate times and, you know, coming from a, you know, middle class over very good family, to then, you know, my room in the hospital has tried to hang himself or I won't you know, I was going to straight jacket and just things like that. So that's what I found. You know, take apart aside from the at the trauma that you go through, what I actually find interesting about the story is how could this person who lived a pretty normal high school life, you know, had friends, brothers, whatever, captain the basketball team, you know, a year later I'm in a straightjackt in the hospital, you know, and those were the main drivers and me writing this, I had to kind of like walk through went from my childhood to these very dangerous places that I experienced from from being manic. Yeah, yeah, I'm glad you did. I glad. I'm glad you took the time, because what you're saying, I'm sure we wasn't it with lots of people, because you're right, sometimes it just sneaks up on you. Don't really have a you don't have any experience or anything to relate it to. So you don't know. You've heard the term bipolar, you've heard people use loose terms like crazy or whatever, but I think when I first first hit me I really felt like I was losing my mind and I didn't have a word for it. I just I ended up in her emergency psych ward. Maybe like you and I'm I just told the doctors that I just fucking feel crazy. I just I'm out of it. You know, they start to go through all the how are you sleeping? That at all? That, all that stuff. So it is a learning process and kind of like you, I'd hoped the psych ward might have been like of some kind of panacey. I like yeah, finally help. No, it wasn't like that at all. For me, it felt and it's still does when I'm having a critical episode.

I've almost swear that the doctor's am Mo is just a bore me enough to leave. They're like put him in the way to hear for like six hours. He'll get over it, and you know, sometimes I fucking do, because if you're in the waiting room at a psyche emergency, you know unit in a major city, you're going to want, you don't want to leave, because there are not like mental illness as a contest, but there are some seriously fucked up people in the emergency psyche wards. So it often feels weird as a person that can typically function except for, you know, occasional episodes, it feels strange to be in a waiting room looking through the glass at what appears to be the CUCKOO's nest. So yeah, I'm glad you stuck it through. Did you feel when you got diagnosed finally, after the third episode? Did that label help you? Did you feel like okay, cool, have an answer, or do you think it stigmatized you? I ad help me and I I'll are like my first thought was fear. Okay, I have this thing. I didn't know anything about it. Try to learn side effects of medication. You know, you have doctors saying you're taking medicine the rest of your life. Now you know, and I'm very compliant. I mean I resisted and was very defensive when I was manic and being taken involuntarily, and it is Hossbo experiences. But once I knew what was going on, it's like, okay, tell me what I have to do. You know, I know, I understand, there's no guarantees. I understand all this stuff, but you know, I'm going to do what you tell me to do because you're the professional. And once I got into a routine, I almost I don't want to say that my pore is good in any way, but I just started to feel like this is part of me and I'm going to live with it and I'm going to have a happy life with it and I'm just going to do everything I can and I'm going to accept the Times that it's dangerous or whatever happens. You know, I can't control that. But I did see it as like, what the Hell is this? What do I have to do? This is scary. You know, if I get a ache in my leg, is that for medicine? You know, I have to really understand my body and what's happening with medication and and you know, I've again I'm good doctor, so that I'm thankful for that too. But once you get that squared away, it becomes like like I can write my own future and and I'm I really don't really, you know, see it. As you know, my other's a cloud over my life now and I can't live. I'm I'm looking at it positively, like without it I wouldn't been able to write this book or really understand some of these things. And you know, it's there's a lot of positives that comes with being able to talk about your experiences and just use it, you know, use it and take value from it. That's kind of my goal. Yeah, I agree. I felt the same way and in many ways I felt like my diagnosis was more of a road map, like what for where? Earlier, before I was diagnosed, I didn't know where to go, like I was driving around all over left, right, up, down. Once you have a diagnosis, at least you have especially in the nowadays, with the Internet, you could just go see what other people are doing to help themselves, and it does provide a lot of clarity. That said, I don't go around sharing with everybody I meet. Hey, I've got bipolar and clearly I don't use like a stage name on the podcast and things like that, because I still have to work and stigma is real and damnaging, of course, but I always likened it to I mean, like you see pair of Para Olympic athletes that are missing limbs. I mean they know they're missing a limb and they could either sit and do nothing or they could continue to live their life as best as they can and sue to that end. Like you said, just embracing what we have, using the diagnosis as a roadmap and moving forward, I think is such a critical part of the healing process of any mental illness. So I really applaud you for that especially...

...than now when you're I noticed you. So you grew up with the older any younger brother? You're the Middle Child. Yeah, to I don't want to talk out of turn, but have your brother's experience any kind of mental impairments? They have any anything similar to bipolar at all? Now they're both perfect. Well, they they don't. They haven't had to deal with, you know, mental honess in this way. But you know, they I'm they're very supportive and yeah, we all played on the same basketball corps and compedate our whole lives with the same you know, no one there was no disability. We were playing and beating each other up. Yeah, that. Yeah, I guess I'm the one that had to experience these things and they've been supportive. So it's almost feels like, you know, obviously we're not all going through it, but they're there for me if I need them and you know, I definitely feel like I have people to lean on, which makes it easier for sure. For that is so great. It's so nice to hear when I when I hear stories of sufferers, or people with bipolar, whatever you want to call them, having a tight knit support circle, and they've been there since before, since the before time, you know. So they really know you, they know the core of you as a person and I'm sure they see is just the thing. And of course I mean personally speaking. I would much rather have heard that, sir, you have bipolar disordered than you have cancer and you're going to die of pancreatic cancer and it's six months or something like that. You know. So right there was definitely, of all the diagnosis we could have had, bipolar was not bad, because I'm like, well, there's parts of this I could actually embrace. I'm a creative person. Sometimes the HYPO mania, when I'm still functioning and not quite totally spun off the rack, I do lots of great creative work. That's a same fact. Most of my life has been Oh, here comes to Hypomania. Let me go earn a bunch of money right quick before I get depressed, for a year ago broke. So it's this up and down and up and down and up and down, but knowing that it's not cancer, it's not diabetes, it's just bipolar in my mind. I don't want to diminish it to the listener or anybody new, because I know people that are new league diagnosed or are often very sensitive about it, and you know we understand. I just don't want you to think we don't. But there are some things within the spectrum of bipolar that are useful when you're trying to be productive. Yeah, and I find it really interesting and I think what separates it from, you know, a sickness or something that only makes you feel worse or takes your energy. I mean there's a lot of places where you have bipolar to sort of nobody knows it and you're actually performing very well and you can't see it. So I think I just think that's like a definitely like a factor that that I find interesting is you just wonder, here's here's a basketball team brought our casts, you know, defensive player of the year and the NBA A and and you don't nobody knows these bipolar out there. You know some of these entertainers there there bipolar, and it just shows you that it does allow there's no limitation, you know, if you can get it under order. And it just seems like if you can can find that that part of it a special it can actually kind of why you to find success somewhere. And I don't want to generalize, but that's just what I've seen, what I've experienced personally. Yeah, same here. When I would go to peer to peer support groups, like the depression and bipolar support lions. DBSA has peer to peer support groups. Sometimes I would go on a certain night and almost everybody there was simply depressed, like unipolar depression, not bipolar at all. I don't want to say simply to press...

...because depression is fucking miserable, but I would get in that group and I'm like Ah, these people don't get me that. I got to find a different group now. So there's some benefit to that. The mania, the hyperactivity, the just general kinetic activity in the mind, and so yeah, I would have. Yeah, I guess if I had to choose between bipolar and general depression, I would pick bi polar. It sounds like a weird thing to say and I don't want to imply that hey bipolars from at all because the depressions miserable and a lot of times I'm depressed and manic at the same time, in a mixed state, which is super fuck because I always likened it to like well, I'm depressed enough to kill myself and I have the energy to go do it right, so that that's just miserable. Tell me about your other hobbies. Like I noticed in the book you mentioned music a lot. Do you do music or like what's what's the how do you function in life like, aside from running the book? What do you do? Yeah, I mean I love I love music. I don't play any music, but I just always have it on. I'm very into like hiphop, but I like most, most other music as well. I play Amateur Chess, so I play a lot of a lot of chests and I compete once a month for like a team in my city. And then, I think you know, I know one to texts hold them with something I played for fun during my childhood, but I really got some good advice and was able to do that as my career for a few years. So I definitely enjoy poker and I like teaching poker and training on poker as well. So so generally, you know, I've had I've never had a job for more than three years the same time, and I had a really good experience working for some some gyms and for a startup that did really well. So I'm just trying to apply my energy and to whatever it is and kind of pick it up. So right now, you know, I play poker as a hobby, at play chess is a hobby and I run a small real estate company and I'm just, you know, son some time on this book and I'm actually getting certified and mental health first aid in about a month so that I can hopefully teach some things and actually learned thanks, not just like on the job can buy poor experience, which is very dangerous. Yeah, I when I want to learn. You know, what are the essential things that people can take away instead of just my story that is unique to me? That's great. I love that. Well, and I don't want to put too much emphasis on the listener to be productive. I mean I kind of have issues with capitalism in general. I don't mean it was like, Oh, you got to be productive. Why? Why? If we don't have to? Why? But I like that you are productive and I like the way you are doing it. You do it similar to the way I've finally discovered his best and that's having a handful of things you're really good at that you could switch between almost not depending on your mood. You don't want to like change jobs every two weeks or whatever. That's not what I'm saying, but to be able to both have a kind of an intellectual and creative outlet. You are self controlled schedule, like it sounds like you can. You can control your schedule to some extent, being self employed, being an entrepreneur. I think that's critical for people that have, let's call it functional impairments, because the pressure of trying to fit into society with the forty hour a week job, showing up and having a boss that doesn't understand you or co workers that wonder why you're always get to call in sick or anything like that, that adds a whole different layer of stress. So I'm glad that you brought up the fact that you are you are productive again, not not that that's everything in the life, but it is important because I think it makes you feel good, makes you feel like increases your esteem. It feels like you can sustain yourself if everything else went to crap. Yeah, just, yeah, I think to you know, I was going to say just in terms of recovery and stability in general. To I think there's a way to...

...view your recovery is something that you can be productive towards, for your own benefit. And what I mean by that is, you know, I do a morning routine, you know, med page, stretch, reading exercises, medicine, healthy breakfast. You know, afternoon is medicine and bringing exercise and nighttime is breathing actually medicine. And like those are things that don't take way along and anybody can do them and it's a hundred percent. Is Noticeable, like I can tell when I'm flacking a little bit versus when I'm doing it, and I think if you know, if nothing else, and I'm trying to be careful, like I think I would hope. I would hope to be able to send the message out that, like, medicine is definitely working for me and doing these activities is definitely working for me and you know, I feel like they are doable by anybody and so that you know, having discipline and being productive in those areas. I've definitely found a lot of success in my recovery. And you still look at your count for you you have time and you know work is definitely something that needs to happen, but I think you know you take fifteen minutes in the morning every single day or you know when you can, you see results and you know that is fully in your control. You know when you're up for it and if you see the value in it. So that's definitely something you'll kind of like being productive in your own recovery, like I found that to be yeah, yeah, definitely that's important. Yeah, just and to be active, to be engaged in your recovery. And I get your point. A lot of times I'm somewhat flippant, especially on twitter, and I forget that I don't have to say the whole message, like, for example, what you just said about healthy eating and exercise and things like that. That is so critical. But if you would only say that to a person that's suffering, they would just probably snap back and say, you know, exercize and Water is not going to cure my mental illness. Like, we get it. That's not what we're saying. We're saying that it will definitely help in addition to your medicine. I can say to like my recoveries are pretty unique, like I go way up and then I go way down and then I have a consistent eighteen month recovery. So for me it's probably a little easier to build my schedule back and add these things and see over time, because I'm not constantly going up and down right in there too, like I'm tailoring. It works for me and I think I'm at an advantage in that way because I have these consistent, you know, slow inclines and that, you know, that's where this came from, this style. Yeah, and it's true, and we can we've both kind of hit on this. Similarly, everybody situation is completely different, completely unique, and it often takes not weeks or months but years, literally, year after year after year, before you start to detect these patterns. And once, once you do detect them, then you can manage them a lot easier and you start to feel a lot more comfortable with them. So, yeah, I think that's a critical point, just starting to just pay attention to your own cycles or patterns or I'm not sure the best or the medicinal or clinical way to say that, but just you letting it be and not freaking out, not panicking about the fact that you're having an episode, especially once you've been diagnosed. Excuse me, once you've been diagnosed, you kind of know what it is. You know you're not going to die of that. Specifically, you might become suicidal, but you're not going to just die of bipolar like cancer, going back to that morbid example. So yeah, so you have you have some option, one like it. There's choice of an option eventually. Yeah, and and not to not suicidality. That's fucking ridiculous as well. I just get so bad there. I've been there so many times and the moment I pull back from it, I'm like how, why did I get how did it get that bad? Yeah, it's inexplicable. So to the listener, we know there are times when you're suffering. In fact, if this is one of those times, I'm just like, well, just take it five minutes at a time. It doesn't...

...have to be an hour at a time. Doesn't even have to. People say just take it one day at a time. I'm like, I don't know if I'll be alive by sundown. So it's really important just to sit your standards and put your goals, measure your goals in little chunks that you can actually accomplish. So you know, like you said, breathing, that's so critical. It's one of the things I suck at because I get hyper, I get excited, I want to do at all that and then before I know I'm like I got breathe, that's right. So focusing and making time to breathe. I'm sure there's lots of APPs. People put it on their watch and things like that. So, yeah, breathing is critical, probably more important than and I don't mean that like the you need air, but I mean like concentrated breathing, deep breathing, making space for your mind in that moment while you're breathing. I think it's a bigger deal than most people give considerations. You right now, right, I can eatier when then some of the other way to get a win. Yeah, it's it's weird too, because even if you're dead depressed laying in bed, sometimes I'm like, I can't get into the breathing thing right now. I'm just going to roll over here for just sleeping the rest of the week. Yeah, yeah, now, I get that. Totally get that. Yeah, it's hard. No kidding, it's hard, but I'm glad you put it all together, since this book, I think, will really establish you as as a true author. Do you have plans to write more in the future, after you collect more stories, or once you get certified as a mental health first age you do, you like to write enough to write another book. So I started writing a little bit more. I wrote about a hundred pages of kind of some sort of recovery or what I'm doing now, and I kind of the interesting thing about writing for me is going to that place where I'm in the scene and thinking about what's going on. So fortunately I've been in a very healthy place for a deep probably about a year since I got things organized, and so I haven't had those like moments where I'm like, I want to dig back into when I was so depressed and what I was thinking and feeling and seeing, and so I wrote about a hundred pages. Very it's more of like a light type of self help thing. What I found was I might just that might just be better as a social media or, you know, some encouraging types of things I can put online. I'm kind of pick and choosing from that and I have, you know, a unfortunate hopefully I don't have to write anymore. I'm daring to say right I think it would take something like that for me to really, you know, feel worth it to get back in there. But but yeah, I absolutely want to learn more and I think, as I learned more it might not be as entertaining and interesting writing, but hopefully helpful. That brings up something else I noticed in your bio. So when you write in very descriptive terms, there's a word you use for condition you have that lets you recall things with explicit detail. You want to talk about that real quick sure. It's called Hypernesia. I didn't know as a thing until I let my doctor actually read the manuscript or yeah, before I was even published, and she looked at up and determined like that I have that and essentially it just allows me to recall very specific things in grades during times of Trauma. So, like you said before, you not a lot of people with bipolar writing books about, I mean mature their song. But what I try to do was just give you that experience and pull out from, I guess, that ability that I have to tell a wow you to walk through it with me, the danger, the music, that the highs, the looes. So having that condition, it just allows me to recall things in great detail and I think I've read a bunch of books on my poor. I think that is what I...

...thought makes this book unique compared to the other ones that I've read. Yeah, and so that. Yeah, that's called Hypernesia. Yeah, I think so too, and I think it's what made reading those little vignettes of your stories much more engrossing and in I kind of need that for me when I read fiction or nonfiction of the biography type stories, I need that detail, otherwise it just gets kind of dry. So I thought that was really cool and I couldn't I started think, because I think that way too. But then I start to wonder, is that just my creative brain kicking in and making up stuff? But I'm like, now, let me check. So I'd asked friends or family about old stories and they're like, yeah, that's totally what happened. How do you remember that? I like, I don't know. How do you not remember it? So I just now I think it's super valuable as a creative writer to have that skill. So I encourage you to keep writing, whatever it is like, even if it's not your story, just to to keep that muscle flex so to speak. Sure. So what? How can people help you, aside from buying your book? Obviously, again we're talking to were talking to Brett Stevens. He wrote the Book Crossover. It's brand new. It's up on Amazon. Lots of five star reviews. Link is in the notes below. So, aside from buying your book and kind of shedding some light on to the society about bipolar, how can people that hear this help you or find you or communicate with you shorter? So you can definitely you can email me directly. My it's just be a Stevens for a to a gmailcom. We have a website like you mentioned before, inside Amantic mindcom. We're on facebook crossoverlooking sidemanic mine and then instagram and twitter crossover, underscore book and then rest Stevens on Linkedin. But I think the one of the things that I think that this could be actually helpful for, instead of just being a broad story, is if if you're a medical professional or a teacher trying to help a student or a patient or family member understand what mania is or what a ramp up to a manic episode, what is it like to be inside of a hospital? A few people that I've handed it to that are in that that field have shown it to patients and have been able to explain things in plain terms, not medical language, that that has been helpful. So I think if you know, if you anyone who is interested in kind of actually using it as a resource to walk through an example with someone that might need it. I think that's been the biggest thing. So other than that, I mean I'm just going to I'm going to get certified and mental first aid. I'm going to really, really have a lot of learning to do to figure out really how I can help in the way that I'm going to be able to help in. So just communicate with me and I'll try to keep everyone posted on what I'm doing. And then, you know, the goal here is for me, first it's going to be to teach family members and friends how to deal with someone who is going through an episode or how to get ahead of it, and that's going to be my first goal. I want to just keep it to that so that I can kind of go from there and see see where that can be valuable next. That's great points, specially the point about medical professionals trying to reach for examples to share with their new patients. Reach no further. You've got some free research right here, the books called Crossover. When you see all the random books on Amazon or whatnot, look forward. Looks like a kind of a gray cement color background with the bright pair of Red Converse on the front. That's the correct book. That's Brett's book crossover. Look through it, scan through and it's a great kind of book because you can flip through it and jump to a different story, to a different story. I don't think it has necessarily be read in chronological order. My correct. I think it's meant to be in chronological order, but you can definitely...

...get get the meat of it by swipping through. Yeah, just kind of suck it books, but I'd I love them, but I like I'd tip typically jump around and I found that to be easy for me as well in yours and you can kind of step through it. Yeah, the section were written like when I ran out of energy that day. That's that's when the section ended. It only goes as far as my attention band can take me for their relatively short section. I like that fair. It's perfect. It's not necessarily sort of they're like the perfect amount of digestible storytelling. I think, and especially coming from a manic perspective, it's so critical to get that out there and again reflecting your stories, with hearing your voice on a show like this, I think people start to get the idea that, oh, bipolar, is it what I thought it was? They're not flame and lunatics. They they just have episodes, and to experience what our episodes look like. That's the thing right there. Go look at those and, honestly, if you see somebody tripping out in public, maybe don't be such an asshole to that person. Do your best, like like the Chubby guy at the pizza parlor. Just do your best to satisfy the situation. Yeah, and that's thing. Yeah, I mean, and for sure. Well, I think we've all been there and, especially upon hindsight, we can see that we were the instigator and some of that. But just the same, I've seen plenty of instances where somebody's kind of a little in need, I guess, in public and they're clearly suffering of something. So I would hope that the public would read stories like yours and understand that, oh, he's just having an episode, like if you see a person flopping around with epilepsy. You know, if you known people with epilepsy, they say we'll give him some space, you know, make sure it hurt his head or that kind of thing. There's certain things you can do to help a person having an episode, tackling them, rushing them, blocking them from escape, that's not going to help. So I think by reading your stories, the average lay person will be able to better understand bipolar disorder in general and maybe even help in a specific instance in the future. So that's that's fucking great man. Thank you. Yeah, so we'll close it out and we were talking earlier about a lot of people just drop off after about twenty, twenty five minutes, so I don't want to go too long for the listener. I think we've got a bunch of good stuff. Do you feel like you've got enough of your story out so far? Oh yeah, for sure, cool, cool. So Brett and I met via twitter. We're both on twitter. If you want to follow either of us, come on along. We're happy to have you and so far as I can tell, we're both very communicative. If you want to reach out to US personally, go right head. We will respond. So, that said, Brett, I really appreciate your time. Everybody listening. Brett Stevens Common Spelling Book is called Crossover. It's available wherever you buy books. You should go get it, read it, share it with some friends or, better yet, have your friends by their own copy. So thanks again, Brett, and I look forward to checking in with you at several months or so. How about that? I'm going to me. Thank you right on man. Well, have a great weekend, you guys in Brett, have a happy holiday, whichever ones you celebrate. Appreciate you and I look forward to talking to you soon. All right, pame to you who Goggle, make me go.

In-Stream Audio Search

NEW

Search across all episodes within this podcast

Episodes (132)