John | Podcasting
John | Podcasting

Episode · 9 months ago

The Starving Artist's Guide to NFTs

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

John's reminder that the poor people are being left behind and we should all help "starving artists" like the mentally ill, chronically homeless, and abandoned humans of all ages create NFT art in the blockchain. Also, John gives working artists a few simple tips about entering the NFT/Twitter arena for the first time — tips that may save your sanity. Follow @johnemotions and @jlillyproject .... For a good time, call (405) 440-3330

Can you believe they sponsor this show? Like, don't they read through the transcripts and see how many times I say fuck and how little I care about corporatism? Jesus Christ, play some of that rock music. Well, Hey, welcome back. It's the Friday after Thanksgiving, you know, the long holiday weekend in America. How are you? I hope you survived. Well, clearly you did survive. You're here. So Hey, now what's up? Yeah, so I got an email from my podcast hosts, sounder DOT FM, and it said change of terms, blah, blah, blah. We've now turned on monetization by default. You have to go turn it off if you don't want to. It's for whatever, like what the fuck cheese? So it turned out to be easier to turn on the ads then to turn them off. So we'll see. I'll let the ADS play. I don't know what fucking ads play before this show or after the show. I have nothing to do with that. I just know that if enough of them play, they'll give me some money and I can pay to fucking host the podcast. So the podcast will then pay for itself. If the ads bother you, let me know. We're for free to make fun of all these fucking companies. I heard the gap, I heard a McDonald's AD. You know, fuck all those companies whatever. So it's fine, just let it go. The old thing I didn't like ads because I listened to podcast in the car and the particular car I use has really crappy interface. I'm into good interfaces. Well, this one there's no fast forward in ten seconds or...

...thirty seconds. It's there's one fast forward button and it goes completely to the next episode. So if I'm two thirds the way into an episode and I think the back button will take me ten seconds back because I missed something, no, it takes me all the way back to the fucking Intro, like God damn it. So I don't like ads for that reason because I don't know how to skip them in my listening environment. But apparently most people have a little skip button. So if you hear an ad, just fast forward through or something whatever. It's not like anything I say is that important. Anyway, I digress. Today I'm talking about so yeah, I've been talking about the past few episodes and FT's, which probably dry and you fucking crazy. I know when it's you know, like a topic on Saturday night live and probably half the dinner tables in America whatever. So I apologize if it sounds like over and again. So I won't talk about them as much, but I do like talking to the artist who create them, and there's you know, there's plenty of artists creating nfts that have mental illness in their history, so that's kind of cool. There's tons of people I can have on the podcast now. That makes it a little exciting for me, and you right, but I have to apologize to my friends, my real life friends and a couple of my friends on twitter who have been harassing to make their art into nfts. I Apologize, like you. Nobody you don't have to turn your art into nfts. And there are some downsides to the NFT world, as I call it, like especially nft twitter, and we'll get into those in just a minute, because I know when I edit some of these podcasts they say things like Oh, what's not to like about nfts? Well, speaking in context, what I'm talking about there is the mechanics of locking...

...your art onto the blockchain and getting royalties from it whenever anybody wants to buy it into the future. That's the pure context. But now there's so much toxic behavior on nft twitter and that's where you have to go, particularly to sell your art. But let's back up a little bit, because the title of this episode is basically nft for starving artist, so we need to get back to the origin of that statement here. So here's what's up and a little background. The idea that anybody can put their art up and lock it down and profit from it is amazing. The problem, though, not anybody can do that, and a lot of people that are making nft's are pretty privileged and they don't understand how many people maybe are left behind already simply because they don't have the very necessities of life, let alone a tablet and a stylust or a computer or, you know, away calm fucking IPAD. You know, pick your pick your tool. These things all cost money. Oh, and electricity. That means you have to have a place to live that has power, that's turned on, and none of that makes a difference if you don't have any food because you're hungry and you have to steal food from the grocery store. You following me? Not Going to get too dark just to start reality. So my heart is kind of near and dear to those underdogs, or also people that kind of society has forgotten, because when I was young, like thirteen, fourteen years old, I was kicked out completely. I had nowhere else left to live, so I bounced from home to home forevermore until I got in my like twenty, twenty one year old, got married, started off, got lucky, you know, had a good life for a while, that kind of thing. So that was all good, but my heart's always been out there for people that are just been shunned or just kicked out, scapegoaded, however you want to frame it, from...

...their families, from their lives, whether they already had a mental illness or whether that situation, being abandoned like that or neglected, caused a mental illness. It doesn't really matter, because you get locked into the same cycle regardless and it takes a lot to break out. Fortunately I broke out. So I always had the idea that I should give back, like because I'm like yeah, I made it through, I can give back. So I worked in Juven Hall when I was younger for like five years, worked as a as an activities coordinator there, and then most recently I was the director of a nonprofit, what they call hotel in San Francisco, and that place had a hundred and sixty apartment units in it, and in each of those, well, I'd say eighty percent of them were people that were, for lack of a better term, crazy, mentally ill of some sort, fresh out of homelessness. So they hadn't been taught how to live in a home or a homed environment, in shelter. They didn't know how to live in shelter. And you sprinkling about twenty percent of people who were able to tolerate that environment just to live in a cheap spot, in a killer location in downtown San Francisco, which otherwise cost a fortune. But by living and working in that hotel, man, I saw so many stories and heard so many, you know, vibrant lives, share what they had to give that are not being captured, will never be captured, and that just leads me to think. Imagine all of the senior citizens right now who live alone. They don't know how to capture a name of this, but they want to express they have art inside them waiting to come out, but they have no way to get it out because they don't have the funds that are on fixed income. They you know, any little bit of income over a certain amount they have to report and then they lose their government funding and it's just the whole shit show. These people are kind of locked into a fucked up lifestyle and they have no way to create. Yet they have lifetime decades and decades, and...

...there's we're talking people from like sixty, seventy, eighty up towards of ninety years old. Some are even older, that have so much art and creation stuck in their soul that they could get out that they're not able to. So I think it's kind of incombent upon us that do have the means, or are generating the means through our you know, crappy new gifts and pet J pegs, maybe to help on board some of the people who have absolutely nothing. So for sure that means setting up, you know, classrooms and places where there are computers for people to use or even take home or give them, you know, tablets and things like that. Just needs to be organized. But man, if there was a nonprofit that was specifically geared toward getting the poorest of poor people with the right gear in their hands and the connections and, you know, teach them how to on board, on to open see or object or wherever, and just show them how to do it and then give them grants so they can fund a wallet for a little bit, teach them how to buy art, how to sell their art and those kind of things. That's as a huge audience we're missing right now. It's people that just aren't on computers right now. To begin with. Those people all have art inside of them. That's far more valuable than somebody who just picked up a tablet in the stylus three months ago and started drawing Jay pigs. It's just not possible to have tenzero hours of experience in six months. So just two heads up. That's going to be kind of ongoing theme. Like what do we do about the poor people? What do we do about the poor people? How do we help the poor people get their computers together and get their, you know, creative setups going so that they can start creating the art, telling the stories? I'm sure they've got poetry, they've got painting that could be digitized, you know, real life painting that we could take photos of. They've got cameras. We can give them cameras. They can take pictures of things of their lives. There's so many things that would just enrich the Internet, enrich web three, if we just had better...

...access for them and to on board people with absolutely nothing. I'm not talking about poor folks that use Tz I'm talking about people that don't have any money to put into a wallet, to even open a bank account, to get a coin base account, you know, those kind of folks. We need to help those people and in my mind I can envision it all the way through the end. It seems pretty straightforward and I may actually turn Emo Dojo from like a drum Dojo to and nft on boarding Dojo where it's just a nonprofit that exists to on board super poor people into the NFT world. Let me think about it. All right, this next part is for artists of you that have a couple hundred bucks that want to try to get into NFT's that's easy. Wait, let me clarify. It's simple. It's not easy because there's some mental gymnastics that go on in the nft world. So it is simple, but don't get carried away. I think I've described earlier. Or you can figure out how to get involve with the you know, the setting up the thing. Basically just put a couple hundred bucks into a etherory and wallet or a Tes Wallet. I've tried out this new money. It's called Tz because it doesn't the transaction cost are next to nothing, whereas the transaction cost using etherium can be upwards of a hundred hundred fifty bucks just for the transaction cost. Even if the item only cost five dollars, the transactions a hundred and fifty bucks. So here's a some things right from the beginning. If you're an artist and you want to get involved, I would recommend following the music industry into the teszs coin. So get a tes Os Wallet,...

...you know, put like fifty bucks on there. Go Get yourself a dot tes name. You can just, you know, Google Dot tes domains or tess domains, tesz Os is Tezos, and then go to a place like objectcom, oh B J Katiecom, you know, kind of clever way of spell it object, and get you a little account set up. And it's basically as simple as like any other social media platform is. You simply upload a JPEG or a gift or a little small, you know, movie five I'Le and it could be anything. Could be you, you know, dancing in your living room. It could be a logo you designed, could be a guitar riff you just played. I don't know. Anything. You want to like lock into eternity on the blockchain, basically, and that's the fun part. So basically, the hardest part is just getting set up, and what you're set up, you can put your postep now. The second hardest part is promoting or even having to be on social media, twitter, for example. So the idea that makes crypto and blockchain in particular so awesome is that the technology is decentralized. That means no one party isn't charge of the technology. Everybody is in charge of it, everybody can see it, and that whole thing's great, very transparent. However, decentralized does not mean democratic and it doesn't mean fair. It just means the software is decentralized and it also means everything's transparent. So you think that would make there be less crime. However, that's not the case either. There's no more or less crime in Crypto, in the blockchain world than there is in real life.

We're dealing with the same humans here. So humans in the real life. You know, ten percent of the time they turn out to be criminals. Same thing in the crypto world. Ten percent of the time someone's running a fraud out there, a pyramid scheme, you know, pumping up their stupid profile picture, get everybody to spend a bunch of money on and then just you know, that's it. Taking your money by those are all. That's all, it's all I was doing. That's the whole trick by and so the people who do that are actually investors. They're like day traders back in thecom days. They got into Crypto, they have extra money to spend and they're just having fun making more money, basically. So, as an artist, avoid all of those people. You're not there for this. You're not. You're not starting NFT's to get rich right now. You're starting and FT's to get started. Just start. This is like when the Internet first started. This is that all over again, and FT's are just starting. So just go start locking down your stuff and getting used to the tools. Don't get involved with the profile pick projects. The PFP's is they're called board apes, punks all that. Those are day traders. Those are wealthy people trading visual examples of their wealth. That makes sense. In other words, it's not for you. If you think like that's what you're trying to sell to that I mean, I would even think of selling your art at this point. I would just think of learning the mechanics of locking the shit into the blockchain, because that way, if and when somebody comes around to decides your s it is cool and it starts selling. Well, guess what? Now it's moving. Every time someone sells it, you're getting a royalty back, regardless of what it is. You wrote a little high coop on a on a meme. Cool, that's if you did that and that's original and you put it up on the blockchain. What if it came popular five years from now? What have became super popular and you could send your grandkids to college...

...or whatever they're doing, you know, thirty or forty years from now? That's what I think it's all about. It's not about day trading and getting into fights with these fucking, you know, bro Chad fucking guys. They basically the kind of guys who are like in Hollywood or West Hollywood or wherever, driving around in the dumb super cars. Some expensive cars obviously are really nice, but some of them are clearly stupid. Just only a jackass would drive one these. A lot of these are the same followers that just see somebody else having it. They got to have what somebody else has, and that's the whole thing. It's back to MEMISSAS, like we talked about before, wanting, just wanting what other people have. So if, as an artist that's the worst thing, don't get involved in the wanting what other people have. As an artist, it's your job to create the new things that people will want. And you see these otherwise capable artists just chasing fads in the music business. That would be like everyone jumping on the grunge sound. Oh, just hear what's coming out of Seattle. Yeah, okay, let's all start wearing flannel. It's the same thing with the PFP projects. Oh, let's all start having Ab so let's all have punks or whatever the fuck's. You know, it's always the latest greatest thing. But as an artist, why are you jumping on that bandwagon and making more more garbage? You know, like a five year old that's been doing art for three years has more experience than most of the nft artists have now. So the idea that they're creating art specifically for commerce, puts an artificial constraint around their art. It's not even original. They're create and basically it's design. It's design on SPEC hoping that it will sell. So do you want to be a designer or an artist? If you're going to be a designer, get the money at front and then just sell your ass out. If you're going to be an artist, fuck all what other people are doing. Just go make art...

...and don't worry about it. But do get yourself a wallet, learn how the blockchain works, try alternate market places, like if you'd go the Etherian route, you can always go to open see and choose the polygon option, and that's also has a far lower gas fiees as well, kind of like Tzo's. And when you do succeed, remember to give some back. We need to get the poorest of the poor people to people that live in poverty with no computers, can't pay their electricity, have no food in their fridge. We need to find at least to get those people to try to make an NFT, to make a gallery of NFTS for these people so that they can maybe sell one and pull themselves out of poverty for entire year. You know, remember all these TV commercials where you can adopt a kid from Africa or adopt a broken puppy like that? How about buying an NFT for one of these poor old people that's just been poor their whole lives? But our genius artists, we can do better and I think if you start making art, be mindful of the toxic behavior that goes on in the day trading world of PFP's twitter and give back when we make it. That embodies the entire we're all going to make it. Mantra. Just want to say a shout out to Tony Kaya aims. Hope you all had a happy thanksgiving. I'll talk to you soon. Have great rest of your weekend and now back to the wall.

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